One A Day – 772

Cosmic Brujo Mutafuka: Marco Eneidi - alto saxophone, Itzam Cano - contrabass, Gabriel Lauber - Drums
On Stage at Amati Jazz Club: Cosmic Brujo Mutafuka

Cosmic Brujo Mutafuka: Marco Eneidi - alto saxophone, Itzam Cano - contrabass, Gabriel Lauber - Drums

Coloring Outside the Lines

Cosmic Brujo Mutafuka: Marco Eneidi - alto saxophone, Itzam Cano - contrabass, Gabriel Lauber - Drums

In your face

Cosmic Brujo Mutafuka: Marco Eneidi - alto saxophone, Itzam Cano - contrabass, Gabriel Lauber - Drums

Many Colors

Cosmic Brujo Mutafuka: Marco Eneidi - alto saxophone, Itzam Cano - contrabass, Gabriel Lauber - Drums

Rebels

Cosmic Brujo Mutafuka: Marco Eneidi - alto saxophone, Itzam Cano - contrabass, Gabriel Lauber - Drums

Not Black & White

Cosmic Brujo Mutafuka: Marco Eneidi - alto saxophone, Itzam Cano - contrabass, Gabriel Lauber - Drums

Big man, instrument, and sound

Cosmic Brujo Mutafuka: Marco Eneidi - alto saxophone, Itzam Cano - contrabass, Gabriel Lauber - Drums

Magenta Scream

  • Cosmic Brujo Mutafuka: Marco Eneidi – alto saxophone, Itzam Cano – contrabass, Gabriel Lauber – Drums
  • Amati Jazz Club
  • Centro, Morelia, Michoacán, México
  • February 5, 2016
  • Copyright, all rights reserved

This trio, from Mexico City, plays free jazz. Free jazz is a very popular form of jazz, practiced widely in Mexico – and in the jazz community – a bit controversial. Some musicians use the form broadly and often their music appears to border on noise. Others are very controlled and structured and their sound is more recognizable as jazz by non-musicians. There is not a clear split between them – there is a middle ground too – but it leads to conversations among jazz musicians about what is true “free jazz.”

Regardless of where a band or listeners fall on the scale, free jazz is something of a rebel movement with adherents and those that can’t stand it. Taking pictures of this group was a lot of fun. Regardless of what you think of the music, it does stimulate some artistic freedom, or at least it did for me. The musicians are animated and expressive, screaming in the literal sense. They put a lot of passion in their work – how could it not communicate something to another artist?

There will be a rare “extra” post after this one for one photo that I did a few different ways. And there will be another posting tomorrow of more photos from this evening…

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2 Responses

  1. Fantastic images Mike, these are the best I have seen of Marco! Not sure if you heard but Marco (the Sax master) left us earlier this month and his memorial is the 26. Although we parted paths so many years ago Marco was like a brother growing up and i will never forget his friendship.

    • mike says:

      John –

      Thank You for your comment and letting me know about Marco. I didn’t know him well, but I enjoyed his work and I’m sorry to hear he has passed on. He was a great guy.

      Mike

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